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After Joining US on Syria Strikes, France, UK Push for Allied Strategy

France and Britain have called on the U.S. to join with them in pivoting off the missile strikes in Syria to form a long-term strategy aimed at a cease fire and a political settlement to the seven-year-old civil war.

In line with their push for a diplomatic solution, the two NATO allies have also urged the U.S. not to pull out of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) to rein in Iran’s nuclear programs.

President Donald Trump has repeatedly threatened to withdraw the U.S. from the JCPOA when it comes up for renewal next month, despite the potential for blowback from the Iranian-backed Hezbollah militias in Syria.

In their remarks since the stand-off weapons strike against Syria last Friday, both French President Emmanuel Macron and British Prime Minister Theresa May have echoed Defense Secretary Jim Mattis in stating the need for a new allied strategy.

The strikes were aimed solely at the Syrian regime of President Bashar al-Assad and underlined that now was “the time for all civilized nations to urgently unite in ending the Syrian civil war by supporting the United Nations-backed Geneva peace process,” Mattis said shortly after Trump announced the attacks.

At the Pentagon press briefing with Mattis, Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Joseph Dunford noted the presence of the French and British military attaches in Washington, Brig. Gen. Jean-Pierre Montague and Attached Air Vice Marshal Gavin Parker.

At the same time in London, May said “I also want to be clear that this military action to deter the use of chemical weapons does not stand alone. We must remain committed to resolving the conflict at large. The best hope for the Syrian people remains a political solution.”

In Paris, Macron and his Defense and Foreign Ministers made similar statements, and Macron asserted that he had changed Trump’s mind about withdrawing from Syria in several of their phone conversations leading up to the attacks.